Showing 458 results

Authority record

Zero Tolerance

  • GB 1534/ZT
  • Corporate body
  • 1992- present

Zero Tolerance is a charity working to tackle the causes of men's violence against women.

Zamimass

  • Corporate body
  • 1990-c.1998

Zamimass was a radical Black lesbian collective which explicitly aligned itself with socialist politics and intersectional freedom struggles. The group began in December 1990 when three Black lesbians organised Zami Love Day, an alternative celebration to Christmas Day featuring poetry readings, music, and a communal meal. Following this, Zamimass coordinated community actions, creative and cultural events, and a regular newsletter, as well as printing posters and other ephemera. From 1991 onward they met regularly at Camden Lesbian Centre, until the space closed around 1995; after this point, they apparently continued some of their activities before winding down in the late 1990s. The collective's manifesta, a copy of which can be found in the Camden Archive, sets out their vision for working towards liberation along lines of class, race, dis/ability, sexuality, gender, and education.

Yuka

Yo La Tengo

  • Corporate body
  • 1984-present

World Information Service on Energy (WISE)

  • GB 1534
  • Corporate body
  • 1978-present

The World Information Service on Energy (WISE) is an anti-nuclear group, providing information and networking for citizens and organisations concerned about nuclear power, radioactive waste, radiation and sustainable energy issues. They advocate the implementation of safe, sustainable solutions such as energy efficiency and, renewable energy.

Women's Voluntary Service

  • GB 1534
  • Corporate body
  • 1938-present

The Women's Voluntary Services, known since 2013 as the Royal Voluntary Service, was founded in 1938 as an organisation to recruit women into the Air Raid Precautions services to help in the event of war. Today it acts as a voluntary organisation, giving practical help particularly to older people in need throughout Britain. The service has been an independent registered charity since 1992.

Women's Health and Reproductive Rights Information Centre

  • Corporate body
  • 1988-2006

Women's Health was formed in 1988 as a merger between the Women's Reproductive Rights Information Centre (WRRIC) and Women's Health Information Centre (WHIC). The Women's Health Information Centre formed in 1982; Women's Health Information Centre was established in 1983 after a split from the National Abortion Campaign. At the time of the merger, the group was known as the Women's Health and Reproductive Rights Information Centre (WHRRIC), before changing its name to Women's Health.

The aim of the centre was to provide information and support to women on health and reproductive issues, motivated by the idea of information as a form of political empowerment. They worked with, and acted as a resource for, medical professionals, women in health groups, self-help groups, community groups and trade unions in line with the ethos of the Women's Liberation Movement. The centre collected resources relating to all areas of women's health, including books, leaflets, journals, press cuttings and articles. As well as providing an information service, the centre was politically active, and made submissions to the House of Commons Select Committee on AIDS, as well as acting as a point of contact for the media on women's health and reproductive issues.

Women's Health was based near Old Street and closed in 2006.

Women's Church Resource Group

  • GB 1543
  • Corporate body
  • 1989-1996

Following the end of the United Nations decade on women in 1985, a working party exploring the position of women in church was set up in Scotland. On 19 March 1988 an open meeting was held at which Sister Mary Kilpatrick, Secretary Justice and Peace Commission and Mary Shanahan, a Roman Catholic and experienced educational worker, spoke. A year later in 1989, with financial support from the Falkland Community Trust, the Women's Church Resource Group's centre was launched at 15d Hill Street, Glasgow. Co-ordinated by Mary Shanahan and supported by a group of about thirty women, including Pat MacEachan, Honor Hania, Betty Campbell, Kathie Walsh and Barnie Pugh, the WCRG's aim was to support and develop the understanding of the role of women in church and society.
On 16 May, 1996 the last steering group meeting was held and two years later the papers, books and resources of the group were donated to Glasgow Women's Library.

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